PERU

Maximo Laura Tapestry
Maximo Laura Tapestry
Maximo Laura Tapestry
Maximo Laura Tapestry
Maximo Laura Tapestry

MAXIMO LAURA TAPESTRIES

Maximo Laura is an award winning tapestry weaver from Ayacucho, Peru. He is internationally recognized as one of South America ́s pre-eminent and most unique textile artists. His work is the integration and synthesis of ancestral weaving techniques, symbols, memories, myths and rituals with contemporary art and color. All his tapestries are made from 100% Alpaca wool. 

 

Laura is the fifth generation of weavers that learned his craft as a child at the side of his father while growing up in Ayacucho, Peru. He developed his art through internal

self-exploration and external exploration of the world, including a lifelong study of art history and literature beyond the borders of Peru. We have been working together with Maximo for over 25 years, perfecting certain designs and color schemes.

 

RETABLOS

Retablo Peruano
Retablo Peruano
Retablo Peruano
Retablo Peruano
Retablo Peruano

SAUL SALOME GOURDS

Saul's passion for art started as a child watching his parents work. At that time, the work was done with craft tools, charcoal burning using quinoa, which is a hard wood, used to give the burnt black hue to the gourds. 

 

His dedication to the art of engraving gourds became stronger and he started to work full time. Over the years he began to use a pyrographer, trying to reach perfection in the designs regardless of the time it would take. To achieve the final form of a design he had to go through many stages, ruining many mates to achieve his purpose, but the love he has for this art made him dominate the art with perfection. 

 

Currently, Saul has a workshop with his brothers and sister who keep the secret of this art.

Saul Salome Mate
Saul Salome Mate
Saul Salome Mate
Saul Salome Mate
Saul Salome Mate
Saul Salome Mate

Retablos are sophisticated folk art in the form of port

able boxes filled with brightly colored figurines arranged into intricate narrative scenes. From the 16th to the

19th centuries, Retablos were carried through the mountains by Spanish priests as portable religious shrines for Catholic saints. Later, they were adapted by indigenous people to include their own deities and

mythologies. 

 

The retablos depict religious, historical and everyday events. People, animals, and mythical figurines create poignant scenes from a doughy mixture of boiled potato and gypsum powder. For this sculpting process, the only

tool is a small piece of wood resembling an enlarged

toothpick.